Letter to the Editor: Get the yellow fringe off my flag

Martial Law Flag  “Pursuant to 4 U.S.C. Chapter 1, §§ 1,2,& 3; Executive Order 10834, August 21, 1959; 24 F.R. 6865; a military flag is a flag that resembles the regular flag of the United States, except that it has a YELLOW FRINGE border on three sides. The President of the United States designates this deviation from the regular flag, by executive order, and in his capacity as Commander-in-Chief of the military. The placing of a fringe on the national flag, the dimensions of the flag and the arrangement of the stars in the union are matters of detail not controlled by statute, but are within the discretion of the President as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy.” 34 Ops. Atty. Gen. 83.

President Dwight David Eisenhower, by Executive Order No. 10834, signed on August 21, 1959 and printed in the Federal Register at 24 F.R. 6865, pursuant to law, stated, purportedly that: “A military flag is a flag that resembles the regular flag of the United states, except that it has a yellow fringe border on three sides.”

FLAG Martial law; The use of such a fringe is prescribed in current Army Regulation no. 260-10. 34 Ops. Atty. Gen. 483, 485.

Any courtroom that displays such a flag behind the Judge is a military courtroom which is operating under military law and not constitutional law, or common law, or civil law, or statute law.

Restrictions:

Title 4 U.S.C. Section 3 provides that anything added to the Title 4 USC, Sections 1,2 American Flag such as gold fringe MUTILATES the Flag and carries a one-year prison term. This is confirmed by the authority of Title 36 USC Section 176(g). The gold fringe is a fourth color and, purportedly, represents “color of the military law” jurisdiction and when placed on the Title 4 USC Sections 1,2 Flag, mutilates the Flag and suspends the Constitution. (Refer to Title 18 USC Section 242; see Black’s Law Dictionary).

As provided by Title 36 USC SECTION 173 and Army Regulation 840-10, chapter 2-1(b), the Flag of the united States of America is defined and described in Title 4 USC §§ 1,2. Civilians must use the Title 4 USC Sections 1,2 Flag (see Title 36 USC Section 173 and Army Regulation 840-10, chapters 2–7) and when military flags are displayed by Army Regulation 840-10, chapter 2, and Title 36 USC Section 175.

Patriot David Buess, United States